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See Renaissance singers at historic Kinneil

The Gargoyles of GargunnockRenaissance singers are set to entertain crowds at historic Kinneil House in Bo’ness.

The Gargoyles of Gargunnock group will appear as part of a free open day this weekend.

Visitors can step inside the mansion – and enjoy the music – from noon to 4 p.m. on Sunday, August 26, 2018. The event has been organised by the charities The Friends of Kinneil and Historic Environment Scotland.

A spokesman for the Friends said: “It’s great to welcome the singers back to Kinneil. They’ve appeared at the venue over the last few years and have always had a great response.

“The group specialises in Renaissance and Medieval music and seem a perfect fit for the House, which dates back to the 15th century and boasts some of the best Renaissance wall paintings in Scotland.

“Entry to the House, and to enjoy the music, will be free of charge. The last admission to the building will be 3.30 p.m. on Sunday, August 26 – so don’t be late. Please note that tickets for tours will be available from adjoining Kinneil Museum on the day.”

There will also be free orchard-themed cooking workshops (pre-bookable) in the grounds on August 26.

The Gargoyles – Helen Rowell, Zoe Fouracre and Elizabeth Wilkinson – say there are “wandering minstrels”.

The ladies, who don period outfits for performances, are based in the picturesque village of Gargunnock, around four miles from Stirling.

Helen said: “It’s great to perform at Kinneil. It’s a beautiful building – and its open days always draw lots of crowds. We’re looking forward to returning.”

The group formed in 2004 as an amateur acapella folk group. Helen said: “We became medieval singers by accident when we agreed to perform at the Border Reivers Festival in Hawick and then discovered it was a period dress event! Since then we have sung to thousands of people at many festivals and events throughout Scotland.”

She added: “We sing songs from 13th to 17th centuries – about love and war, drinking and lust, religion and nature. We have sung in venues from palaces to battlefields, from old folks’ homes to community centres, from pubs to chapels and from kirks to beer tents. We research and make our own outfits and have a range from the early through late medieval and Renaissance periods.”

After the Kinneil event on August 26, the Gargoyles will perform at Stirling’s Church of the Holy Rude on September 16, and then at an open day at Cambuskenneth Abbey, on the outskirts of the city, on September 22. The Gargoyles will also be “on song” at Bannockburn House on November 24 – and are planning to take part in Christmas fund-raising events.

Helen said the past year has been very busy for the group.

“We finished the 2017 season with appearances at St Cecilia’s Hall Concert Room and Museum in Edinburgh and did a variety of fundraising concerts at Christmas to raise money for the cancer charity Macmillan. We enjoy what we do – and it’s lovely when we can help raise money for charity.”

To find out more about the Gargoyles of Gargunnock, visit: www.spanglefish.com/thegargoyles/

You can also get updates on Kinneil open days at the main website – www.kinneil.org – and through social media sites: www.twitter.com/kinneil and www.facebook.com/kinneil

The Gargoyles of Gargunnock are pictured above. From left, Helen Rowell, Zoe Fouracre and Liz Wilkinson.

NOTES TO EDITORS:

  • Kinneil House, Museum and Estate are on the western edge of Bo’ness in central Scotland, just off the A904 and A993 and are part of the Frontiers of the Roman Empire World Heritage Site. For directions, click here
  • The John Muir Way also runs through the site. For satellite navigation devices, use the postcode EH51 0PR. Images of Kinneil House and Estate are available on request. Email: publicity@kinneil.org.uk
  • You can access a video of the Gargoyles of Gargunnock singing at Kinneil at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ly6h-E4SV8o
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Inside Kinneil House – Arbour Room

MEDIA ENQUIRIES:

For more information, please contact Adrian Mahoney, The PR Store, tel. 01506 823714 or 07967 150560.

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Tour Kinneil House for free in 2018

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  • New series of open days gets underway on March 24
  • Longer opening hours to meet growing demand for access
  • New-style timed tours, leaving from neighbouring Kinneil Museum

It boasts some of the best renaissance wall paintings in Scotland. It was home to one of the most noble families in the country, the Hamiltons. And it’s opening its doors again in 2018.

Historic Kinneil House in Bo’ness – which dates back the late 15th century – is staging a series of free open days this year, starting on Saturday, March 24.

The events will include appearances from costumed interpreters and entertainers – from Romans to Renaissance singers (and even modern-day Rangers). There will also be extended opening hours to deal with growing visitor numbers.

The tours have been organised by Historic Environment Scotland (HES) in conjunction with volunteers from the award-winning Friends of Kinneil charity.

Maria Ford from The Friends said: “Kinneil is a wonderful old building with an amazing history. Our open days aim to bring the site alive with a range of themed experiences, tying into local and national festivals such as Festival of Museums and Doors Open Days.

“All of the tours are free of charge – and there’s no need to book in advance. We’ll allocate places on the day. So, come along on the open days and we’ll show you inside!”

This year, the Friends will run timed tours leaving from Kinneil Museum (in front of the House). These will leave every 15 minutes – up until the last tour, which will be 30 minutes before closing time.

The open days will take place on:

  • Saturday, March 24, 2018;
  • Sunday, April 22, 2018;
  • Friday, May 18, 2018 (evening event);
  • Sunday, May 20, 2018;
  • Sunday, June 24, 2018;
  • Sunday, August 26, 2018;
  • Saturday, September 15, 2018; and
  • Sunday, October 28, 2018.

Tours will start at noon each day – and run until 4 p.m. (last admission 3.30 p.m.) – with the exception of the evening opening on May 18, when the House will be open from 6 p.m. to 7.30 p.m. (with the last admission at 7 p.m.)

Maria said: “Last year, thanks to an investment by Historic Environment Scotland, new areas of the House were opened to the public: extra rooms within the ‘Palace’ section and a viewing platform within the oldest area, the original Tower House.

“Interest in the building grew substantially, with 2,498 people visiting in just eight days in 2017. By comparison, the same number of events in 2016 attracted 1,763 people.”

The first event on March 24 has been organised to tie with the Hippodrome Silent Film Festival – http://www.hippfest.co.uk – running at the nearby Bo’ness Hippodrome, Scotland’s first purpose-built cinema.

“With lots of visitors coming to the town for the Festival, we thought it was a good idea to open Kinneil House at the same time,” said Maria. “The March 24 afternoon opening will allow Festival-goers the chance to have a quick tour of this wonderful building and then go to the movies later in the day. Like the Hippodrome, the House is an A-listed building and a magnificent place to visit.”

Kinneil House is on the John Muir Way – one of Scotland’s Great Trails.

As part of a series of events to tie in with John Muir’s birthday, the House will be open on Sunday, April 22. A costumed interpreter will also be on hand to entertain visitors.

For the Scottish Festival of Museums and the UK’s Museums at Night celebrations in May, Kinneil House will be opening at night – on Friday, May 18. There will also be events and free goodie bags at Kinneil Museum next door – and a bat hunt in the grounds of the big house.

A second Festival of Museums event will be held on Sunday, May 20, with Historic Environment Scotland’s Rangers taking visitors around the surrounding Kinneil Estate, which includes ponds, woodland and a cottage used by inventor James Watt.

June will see Bo’ness get dressed up for its annual Children’s Fair Festival. Kinneil House – an early location for the festival – will open the Sunday before the Fair, on June 24. There are also plans to bring another costumed interpreter to the site.

There will also be an open event on Sunday, August 26, with performances from renaissance singers The Gargoyles of Gargunnock. The HES Rangers will also be back to do Estate tours.

In September, the House – and its wider estate – will be the focus for Big Roman Week, a festival celebrating Falkirk district’s Roman roots. A full programme of events will be revealed later this year – but The Big Roman Day, with appearances by the Antonine Guard re-enactment group, will be at Kinneil on September 15.

The 2018 programme will end with a Hallowe’en themed opening at Kinneil House on Sunday, October 28. The House is reputed to be haunted by the ghost of a white lady.

Malcolm Brown, the District Visitor Operations Manager at Historic Environment Scotland’s Linlithgow Hub, said: “We’re looking forward to the new season at Kinneil.

“We had a great response to opening new sections of the House last year, and also improved the visitor experience with the addition of new lighting and interpretation within the building.

“This year, the Friends will take tours from Kinneil Museum. So, if you do have to wait for access, you’ll be able to enjoy the other attractions in the museum itself. Hopefully, there will be no more queuing outside!

“As ever, the House tours are free of charge and will offer a variety of experiences throughout the year. Look out for costumed interpreters, themed events and walks in the grounds.”

He added: “Although you can tour the grounds of Kinneil House throughout the year, you can only see inside the building on these special open days. We hope that families from across Scotland – and further afield – will pay a visit to Kinneil this year.”

Falkirk Community Trust is opening Kinneil Museum at additional times to tie in with Kinneil House open events.

For more information on open days click http://www.kinneil.org.uk or pick up a leaflet from libraries and local tourist attractions in the Falkirk Council area.

History fans can also keep in touch with updates through social media at www.facebook.com/kinneil and www.twitter.com/kinneil

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NOTES TO EDITORS:

The Friends of Kinneil was set up in 2006 to promote Kinneil Estate and Nature Reserve in Bo’ness. The charity organises Kinneil House open days and other events for members and visitors. (No. SC038368). The group won a Scottish Heritage Angel Award in 2016. To find out more, visit http://www.kinneil.org.uk

Falkirk Community Trust manages Kinneil Museum and the surrounding Kinneil Estate on behalf of Falkirk Council. It also operates the Hippodrome Cinema in Bo’ness town centre and runs the Hippodrome Silent Film Festival (running this year from Wednesday, March 21 to Sunday, March 25, 2018). Find out more at falkirkcommunitytrust.org – or go directly to the Festival page: http://www.hippfest.co.uk

Historic Scotland and RCAHMS came together in 2015 to form a new lead public body charged with caring for, protecting and promoting the historic environment. The new body, Historic Environment Scotland (HES), leads on delivering Scotland’s first strategy for the historic environment, Our Place in Time. The body cares for Kinneil House using the existing Historic Scotland brand. Historic Environment Scotland is a registered Scottish Charity. Scottish Charity No. SC045925. You can keep up to date with news from Historic Environment Scotland and register for media release email alerts at https://www.historicenvironment.scot/about-us/news/

More on the history of Kinneil House on the HES website – http://j.mp/2GxRqmY

Images of Kinneil House and Estate are available on request. Email: info@kinneil.org.uk

Media organisations can also download images (free for editorial use) from
http://bit.ly/kinneil-pics

Kinneil House and Estate are on the western edge of Bo’ness in central Scotland, just off the A904 and A993, and are part of the Frontiers of The Roman Empire World Heritage Site. The John Muir Way also runs through the site. For satellite navigation devices, use the postcode EH51 0PR.

Issued by The PR Store on behalf of The Friends of Kinneil

Media enquiries: tel. 01506 823714 or 01506 510629; email: info@kinneil.org.uk . More contact details at kinneil.org.uk/friends

The Friends of Kinneil is a registered charity
Charity Registration Number : SC038368
Email us: info@kinneil.org.uk

FB-KINNEILPOSTER2018a

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Discover secrets of historic Kinneil

kinneilhouse-winter300dpi

Historic Kinneil House in Bo’ness will come under the spotlight at a free conference this Sunday, November 19, 2017

The “Experts Day” will take place at the nearby Hippodrome Cinema in Bo’ness town centre. Members of the public are being invited to attend.

The event has been organised by Historic Environment Scotland and The Friends of Kinneil.

A spokesman for the organisers said: “Archaeologists and historians have been working together, delving into documents and surveying Kinneil House. Together they can shed more light on the building than ever before and paint a picture of how it was in its heyday. We’re encouraging anyone interested in Kinneil to come along to this free event and to hear from our guest speakers.”

Doors open at the Hippodrome at 10 a.m. on Sunday. To book a free ticket, visit www.kinneil.org.uk/expertsday or call 01506 823714. The ticket includes a snack lunch and further presentations in Bo’ness Library on Sunday afternoon.

The speakers will include:

  • Tom Addyman, discussing the archaeology of Kinneil House;
  • Arkady Hodge, on documentary history;
  • Michael Pearce, on inventories/reconstructing the interior;
  • Geoff Bailey, discussing the designed landscape and setting; and
  • Adrian Maldonado, talking about the Kinneil Cross (on display within the House).

To find out more about the speakers and the event visit www.kinneil.org.uk/expertsday

Built next to the Antonine Wall, Kinneil House was the chief seat of the powerful and wealthy Hamilton family. Subject to extensions and refurbishments over 300 years, it reflected the Hamiltons’ high status both inside and out. The building is open on selected days throughout the year and boasts some of the best renaissance wall paintings in Scotland.

The house has a good claim to being the birthplace of the improved steam engine. The pioneering Scots engineer James Watt developed his first engine in a small workshop beside the mansion in the 1700s.

The grounds also feature remains of the Roman Antonine Wall, now part of a World Heritage Site. There is also a small museum, which is open throughout the year.

kinneilhouse-boness-interior-arbour-room.jpg
The Friends of Kinneil is a registered charity
Charity Registration Number : SC038368

Visit us online at: www.kinneil.org.uk
Email us: info@kinneil.org.uk

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The Great Big Walk ends with a Big Lunch – and a big rest!

Great Big Walk logo - National Lottery fundedWalkers on an epic trek across the UK got their chance to put their feet up today (Sunday, June 18) . . . and have a cuppa with locals in Edinburgh.

The Great Big Walk – which has seen teams of walkers fan across the country – ended its Scottish leg with a “Big Lunch” event in Pilrig St. Paul’s Church in the capital.

Comedienne Jo Brand set off five walks across the country from Batley in Yorkshire on May 29.

The initiative aimed to drum up interest in the annual Big Lunch project; shine a light on community projects visited by the walkers and also support the Great Get Together. The latter has been encouraging people to attend community events in celebration of the murdered Yorkshire MP Jo Cox, who died a year ago this week.

One of the walkers, Josh Quigley (24), from Edinburgh, said the trek back home from Yorkshire was “absolutely incredible and life-changing”.

He said he was moved to tears after meeting war veterans at The Living Memory Association’s base in Edinburgh’s Ocean Terminal. Another highlight was visiting The Lawnmowers, a theatre group in Gateshead, helping people with learning difficulties.

The Scotland-bound walkers also went to the moon and back – touching bits of lunar rock at Kielder Observatory near the Scottish border. They also had a singing lesson at one of England’s most rural choirs in Northumberland and went on a prayer walk with the Bishop of Durham as they headed north. Bizarrely, someone dressed as Darth Vader turned up the same day . . . .

In Scotland, the walkers visited the award-winning Stove arts project in Dumfries, toured Dumfries House and searched for “dinosaurs” – toy ones – in Cambuslang. They also visited the National Lottery-funded Kelpies and Helix Park in Falkirk.

(Video of interviews with Josh and fellow walkers – plus interviews from different community groups visited – are at http://www.twitter.com/edencommsscot )

Today, the adventure was over and it was time to join representatives from the local community in Leith at Pilrig St. Paul’s Church to reflect on the three-week trek. There were presentations on the Leith Community Cinema – based within the church – and Leith Community Knitting Bee. Knitted bunting dressed the Big Lunch event room.

The Great Big Walk was organised by the Eden Project, with funding from the National Lottery and other partners.

Emily Watts, Eden Communities’ Scotland country manager, said: “We’ve had tremendous support and fun along our way. We’ve stopped at around 30 community projects along our route from Yorkshire to Scotland, some funded by the National Lottery. We’ve met, talked to, eaten with and laughed with, the communities that make our nation what it is.”

She added: “The whole aim of the Great Big Walk has been to shine a light on connected communities while ‘walking an appetite’ for our Big Lunch, which this year is the highlight of the Great Get Together celebrations. Across the UK this weekend, Big Lunches and Get Togethers are taking place in what will be the biggest community celebration the UK has ever seen.

“Just getting people together for a walk, or a lunch, can do wonders for communities and reminds us all there’s more than unites us than divides – a sentiment promoted by Jo Cox.

“If you haven’t organised your own Big Lunch event, don’t worry you can still organise one. Visit http://www.thebiglunch.com for support and information.

“A big thank you to our walkers, our funders and all our partners for making the walk such an adventure.”

ENDS

About The Great Big Walk

The Great Big Walk (thegreatbigwalk.com) is an idea from the Eden Project, funded by the National Lottery and supporters including Pears Foundation and Prince of Wales’s Charitable Foundation. The Great Big Walk has received in kind support from YHA for accommodation, and Renault with a fleet of electric support vehicles. The Great Big Walk connects people and communities, inviting them to take part in the UK’s annual get-together for neighbours by hosting their own Big Lunch events: the highlight of The Great Get Together on Sunday 18 June 2017.

About The Big Lunch

The Big Lunch (thebiglunch.com) is the UK’s annual get together for neighbours, an idea from the Eden Project made possible by the National Lottery. This year, The Big Lunch will be held on Sunday 18 June as the highlight of The Great Get Together weekend. The Big Lunch started in 2009. Last year over 7.3 million people took part in over 90,0000 events across the UK. Her Royal Highness The Duchess of Cornwall is Patron of The Big Lunch. Bringing communities together, reducing loneliness and isolation. and helping to make a difference locally is at the heart of the National Lottery’s mission.

About The Great Get Together

The Great Get Together event marks the first anniversary of the murder of Jo Cox MP, and is inspired by her maiden speech to Parliament when she said “We have more in common and are far more united than that which divides us”. It will be the biggest community event across the UK since the Diamond Jubilee. Up and down the country, get-togethers are being planned – big and small – from Big Lunch street parties to BBQs and games of football to bake-offs. The initiative was started by the friends and family of Jo Cox. They have teamed up with The Big Lunch, which has organised annual neighbourhood celebrations since 2009, and has moved its annual event to coincide with the anniversary. More than one hundred organisations are supporting The Great Get Together, from The Big Lunch, Help for Heroes to Amnesty International; the RNLI to the RSPB; the Scouts, the Guides, The Women’s Institute and The Premier League. The aim of The Great Get Together is to connect people and build stronger communities.

About the Big Lottery Fund

The Big Lottery Fund is the largest funder of community activity in the UK. It puts people in the lead to improve their lives and communities, often through small, local projects. It is responsible for giving out 40% of the money raised by National Lottery players for good causes. Last year it awarded £583 million and supported around 12,000 projects across the UK for health, education, environment and charitable purposes. Since June 2004 it has awarded over £8 billion to projects that change the lives of millions of people.
For more information visit http://www.biglotteryfund.org.uk

Anyone interested in following The Great Big Walk can find out more at http://www.thegreatbigwalk.com

More background information at https://theprstore.co.uk/news

PRESS CONTACTS

Adrian Mahoney, PR for Scotland en route, tel. 07967 150560 –
adrian@theprstore.co.uk

Laura Sutherland, Aura PR, Glasgow, tel. 0141 337 6712 or 07764 936 840

Sarah Boniface, PR Manager, Eden Project Communities, tel. 020 058
2427 or 07976 633674 – sboniface@edenproject.com

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The Great Big Walk

The PR Store is providing PR support en route to The Great Big Walk , running across the UK this June.

Read on to find out more.

You’ll also find PR contacts at the end of this post.

  • The Great Big Walk – thegreatbigwalk.com – is an idea from the Eden Project, funded by the National Lottery and other supporters.
  • The Great Big Walk aims to highlight the rich diversity of communities which make up the backbone of the UK, while demonstrating the commonality we all share.
  • The walk – visiting great community projects en route – also aims to highlight the ordinary people going the extra mile for their communities, whilst walking up an appetite for The Big Lunch: the highlight of the Great Get Together on Sunday 18 June.
  • The walk – actually five treks across the country – launched in Batley, near Leeds, on May 29.

Notes to Editors

About The Great Big Walk

  • The Great Big Walk (website here) is an idea from the Eden Project, funded by the National Lottery and supporters including Pears Foundation and Prince of Wales’s Charitable Foundation
  • The Great Big Walk has received in kind support from YHA for accommodation, and Renault with a fleet of electric support vehicles.
  • The Great Big Walk connects people and communities, inviting them to take part in the UK’s annual get-together for neighbours by hosting their own Big Lunch events: the highlight of The Great Get Together on Sunday 18 June 2017.

About The Big Lunch

  • The Big Lunch (thebiglunch.com) is the UK’s annual get together for neighbours, an idea from the Eden Project made possible by the National Lottery.
  • This year, The Big Lunch will be held on Sunday 18 June as the highlight of The Great Get Together weekend.
  • The Big Lunch started in 2009. Last year over 7.3 million people took part in over 90,0000 events across the UK.
  • Her Royal Highness The Duchess of Cornwall is Patron of The Big Lunch.
  • Bringing communities together, reducing loneliness and isolation. and helping to make a difference locally is at the heart of the National Lottery’s mission.

About The Great Get Together

  • The Great Get Together event marks the first anniversary of the murder of Jo Cox MP, and is inspired by her maiden speech to parliament when she said “We have more in common and are far more united than that which divides us”.
  • It will be the biggest community event across the UK since the Diamond Jubilee. Up and down the country, get-togethers are being planned – big and small – from Big Lunch street parties to BBQs and games of football to bake-offs.
  • The initiative was started by the friends and family of Jo Cox. They have teamed up with The Big Lunch, which has organised annual neighbourhood celebrations since 2009, and has moved its annual event to coincide with the anniversary.
  • More than one hundred organisations are supporting The Great Get Together, from The Big Lunch, Help for Heroes to Amnesty International; the RNLI to the RSPB; the Scouts, the Guides, The Women’s Institute and The Premier League.
  • The aim of The Great Get Together is to connect people and build stronger communities.

About the Big Lottery Fund

  • The Big Lottery Fund is the largest funder of community activity in the UK. It puts people in the lead to improve their lives and communities, often through small, local projects. It is responsible for giving out 40% of the money raised by National Lottery players for good causes.
  • Last year it awarded £583 million and supported around 12,000 projects across the UK for health, education, environment and charitable purposes. Since June 2004 it has awarded over £8 billion to projects that change the lives of millions of people.
  • For more information visit biglotteryfund.org.uk

Q&A

What is The Great Big Walk?

The Great Big Walk is an idea from the Eden Project funded by the National Lottery and other supporters designed to connect people with those they live alongside in the belief that we can make positive connections when we take the time to walk and talk together.

Starting in Batley, West Yorkshire, walk teams will take five different walk routes on a three week long adventure. Each day, along the route, the walkers will stop in a different community to shine a light on powerfully ordinary people doing amazing projects and events that bring communities together.

They will share conversations food, stories and experiences together — just like The Big Lunch. Walkers will visit projects right across the UK to shine a light on ordinary people doing extraordinary things in their communities while walking home to their own community Big Lunch on Sunday 18 June.

When is The Great Big Walk?

The Great Big Walk started on 29 May 2017 and spans three weeks concluding on Sunday 18 June 2017.

What is the aim of The Great Big Walk?

The aim of The Great Big Walk, made possible with funding from the National Lottery, is to drive awareness of and participation in The Big Lunch and shine a light on ordinary people doing extraordinary things to make a difference where they live.  The walk will highlight the rich diversity of the communities which make up the backbone of the UK whilst demonstrating the commonality we all share.

Who is funding The Great Big Walk?

The Great Big Walk (thegreatbigwalk.com) is an idea from The Eden Project, funded by the National Lottery and supporters including Pears Foundation and Prince of Wales’s Charitable Foundation, and partnered by the YHA and Renault.

How is the Jo Cox Foundation involved?

The Big Lunch has moved its date to form the highlight of The Great Get Together weekend.  In the weeks leading up to the celebrations walkers from across the country will be taking part in The Great Big Walk, starting in the late Jo Cox MPs constituency of Batley and Spen and ending back at their home towns in time for their Big Lunch on Sunday 18 June as part of the celebratory weekend. The Jo Cox Foundation is one of the principal partner organisations backing The Great Big Walk.

 

Who are the walkers?

The walkers heading to Scotland are Josh Quigley from Livingston, now living in Edinburgh – known as The Tartan Explorer. Also three representatives from the Glasgow charity Refuweegee, covering the three week walk as a relay: Selina Hales, Hannah Gibbons and Melissa Espinoza, all currently based in Glasgow.

 

How have the walkers been selected?

Over several months applications from right across the UK were submitted through an online form hosted on the Eden Project Communities website. After a few rounds of interviews and much careful consideration an Eden Project panel whittled the list down and selected the amazing eleven walkers.

 

Where are the walkers going?

Five routes set off from Batley West Yorkshire: one team will walk to Scotland, one to Wales, one to Northern Ireland, one to Cornwall and one to London, each walking home in time for The Big Lunch. Every day, the walkers and their supporters will arrive in a different town or village, joining that community to share food, conversations and learn about the wonderful projects and events that bring communities together.

 

How can we follow the walk?

You can follow the progress of all the walkers on thegreatbigwalk.com where you can see all the latest updates. A map will track the positon of the walkers and community stops throughout the three week adventure.

Our live social media feeds on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram will share regular post, video and news so be sure to follow the story as it unfolds!

Follow the project on social media @edencommunities

#thebiglunch #greatbigwalk Thebiglunch.com

thegreatbigwalk.com

 

PRESS CONTACTS

  • Adrian Mahoney, PR for Scotland en route, tel. 07967 150560 – adrian@theprstore.co.uk
  • Laura Sutherland, Aura PR, Glasgow, tel. 0141 337 6712 or 07764 936 840
  • Sarah Boniface, PR Manager, Eden Project Communities, tel. 020 058 2427 or 07976 633674 – sboniface@edenproject.com

 

 

 

 

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Group’s ambitions for sculpture to bring art lovers to Queensferry

A NEW public art sculpture – celebrating Queensferry’s famous bridges – could soon have a new home overlooking the Firth of Forth.

Business group Queensferry Ambition has just gained planning consent from the City of Edinburgh Council to site “The Guardian of the Bridges” on McIver’s Brae, just off Edinburgh Road, at the eastern end of the town centre.

It is hoped work will start on site later this year.

The mosaic sculpture – in the form of a creature or dragon – was developed by artist Debbie Ryan, and is based on designs and mosaics created by local school children from both North and South Queensferry. Debbie ran art workshops in the local community throughout the course of several months. In total over 700 people were involved in the project, from school children to library and community care groups.

“The Guardian” was originally commissioned to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Forth Road Bridge, gaining £25,000 funding from the Scottish Government-funded arts body, Creative Scotland. However, the project was delayed as Queensferry Ambition struggled to get a suitable site.

Debbie said: “The new site is a bit of a gem, allowing people to visit the sculpture and explore the beautiful views and landscape around Queensferry – on foot or by bike.”

She added: “It was great to be involved in the project. I ran workshops with local children to design and create the sculpture. The pupils created their own mosaics and also worked on panels which were incorporated into the actual sculpture. I’m hoping the project will encourage a lifelong interest in the arts for some of the children.”

David Cameron, the chairman of Queensferry Ambition, said: “It’s taken some time to get the right site. I’m pleased we can now go ahead and build a final home for the sculpture on McIver’s Brae. It will add to the attractions in the town and give people another reason to visit Queensferry.

“I’d like to thank Debbie and all the people who have been involved in the project.”

Debbie has worked on a range of projects, including a sculpture called “Discovery” for the Oor Wullie Public Art trail in Dundee and a mosaic sculpture trail for the town of Bervie. Originally from Liverpool, Debbie has been based in Scotland for over four years. She has exhibited her work around the world and her studio is now based in Biggar, South Lanarkshire.

Find out more at https://debbieryan.co.uk/ and https://guardiansculpture.wordpress.com/

NOTE TO EDITORS:
If you have any questions about Queensferry Ambition’s activities, please contact SUNIL VARU, the project manager at Queensferry Ambition,
tel. 07725 044 450, email: info@queensferryambition.co.uk

Issued by ADRIAN MAHONEY, The PR Store, tel. 01506 823714 /// 07967 150560
Email: adrian@theprstore.co.uk

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Wheel gone kids …

pic4Youngsters had a “wheely good time” on Saturday – as they flocked to the stalls in Queensferry town centre.

The kids visited the Queensferry Ambition displays, set up to promote walking, cycling and using public transport. It was part of European Mobility Week.

Members of the 21st South Queensferry Scout Group were out in force to give their support to the campaign.

Giveaways and leaflets were on offer, as well as free bike check-ups and information on electric bikes.

The Enterprise Car Club, which allows people to have a car when they really need it, was represented – as well as Forth Wellness, offering free fit camps for local people.

A mascot promoting Edinburgh’s new 20 MPH zones, which operate in South Queensferry, also joined in the fun.

And researchers were also on hand to ask people about their travel habits – and try to identify barriers to locals becoming more active.

The displays were set up in the car park at Scotmid off the Loan – handily located right next to a great cycle and walking path leading to Dalmeny. It gave some of the visitors a good excuse to go on a bike ride.

This year’s Mobility Week is trying to push home the message that walking, cycling and using public transport is not just greener, and can make you fitter – it can also be good for the local economy.

Maggie Mitchell from Queensferry Ambition said: “Many of us have taken to shopping online, but there’s nothing better than going for a walk around the shops. It gives you some exercise, you can meet some lovely people, have a coffee – and perhaps bag a bargain at the same time.

“I hope people will support the campaign and think about their transport habits.

“Cutting down car use also cuts down emissions and the resulting pollution, and that has to be good for everyone too.”

Saturday’s event and the wider campaign have been funded by Business Improvement Districts Scotland with grant funding from Transport Scotland. South Queensferry’s campaign has also been supported by the City of Edinburgh Council.

 

 

 

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Campaign to get Queensferry moving

walking-cycling-southqueensferry-web1A campaign is underway to get residents in South Queensferry to become more active.

Business group Queensferry Ambition is encouraging locals to walk and cycle more and use public transport.

It says people making “active travel” choices result in a spin-off for the local economy and can boost takings in local shops and businesses.

It’s promoting its message through posters and social media and running engagement sessions with local schools and community groups.

The group is also running an event in the town this Saturday (September 17), with giveaways – including free bike checks – and lots of advice to inspire local people.

Maggie Mitchell of Queensferry Ambition said: “Leaving the car at home and walking, cycling or using public transport gets us moving more and is much greener.

“Figures supplied by the EU show an increase in trading where walking and cycling are the norm – by up to 40 per cent.

“There are other benefits, too. Adults who walk and cycle tend to be more productive at work, take fewer sick days and spend less time, on average, seeing their GP. And children who walk or cycle to school perform better in class.

“In Queensferry, we’re doing some survey work to identify barriers to people being more active in the community. We’re also trying to literally get folks on their bikes by setting up a stall outside Scotmid, just off the town centre, this Saturday (September 17) offering free bike checks and the chance to try electric bikes.”

The stall will also feature information on a local fitness bootcamp, as well as the Enterprise Car Club – which allows people to only have a car when they really need it. There will also be giveaways for children.

John Pryde, who helps run the fitness bootcamp in South Queensferry, encourages people to be more active. He said: “I often recommend starting small – getting off the bus two stops earlier and doing a little bit more exercise. Try something. If you’re moving more than you did before, you’ll be benefiting.”

His advice is echoed by Fiona Grant, a partner in JW Physiotherapy in South Queensferry, said: “Try to incorporate small movements within your day. A short walk at lunchtime, or getting off the bus sooner, or getting out for a walk in the evening. It’s important to tailor things to individuals because everyone is different.”

Saturday’s event and the wider campaign have been funded by Business Improvement Districts Scotland with grant funding from Transport Scotland. South Queensferry’s campaign has also been supported by the City of Edinburgh Council.

It’s part of a programme of events to support European Mobility Week, which gets formally underway on September 16.

Ms Mitchell continued: “Many of us have taken to shopping online, but there’s nothing better than going for a walk around the shops. It gives you some exercise, you can meet some lovely people, have a coffee – and perhaps bag a bargain at the same time.

“I hope people will support the campaign and think about their transport habits.

“Cutting down car use also cuts down emissions and the resulting pollution, and that has to be good for everyone too.”

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The Empire strikes back … the Romans return to Falkirk district

 

romansatkinneil-300dpiFalkirk District’s Roman festival is back – and it’s bigger than ever.

The Big Roman Week kicks off on Saturday, September 17, with the largest programme to date.

Walks, talks, family events and film shows have been organised to help people find out more about the Roman Antonine Wall, which ran from Bo’ness right across Falkirk district to Old Kilpatrick near Glasgow.

Brochures for the nine-day festival are now available from local libraries. You can also check listings at http://www.bigromanweek.org.uk

Councillor Adrian Mahoney, Falkirk Council’s tourism spokesman, has been helping to organise the festival. He said: “Big Roman Week offers lots of great events, many free of charge, right across Falkirk district. With the help of great partners and speakers, we’ve organised a packed programme for 2016. We hope people enjoy it.”

Highlights include:

* Big Roman Day at Kinneil House, Bo’ness, on September 17 – a family fun day featuring the Antonine Guard re-enactment group;
* events for children at Meadowbank, Bonnybridge, Falkirk, Grangemouth, Larbert and Bo’ness Libraries;
* a free conference on the Antonine Wall in the Bo’ness Hippodrome cinema;
* Roman cooking displays with John Crouch, who appeared on Robson Green’s “Tales from Northumberland”;
* talks from a guest speaker from Odenwald, Falkirk district’s twin area in Germany;
* walks along the Antonine Wall – at Bo’ness, Polmont, and at Castlecary, near Allandale;
* a community archaeology session in Camelon, Falkirk; and
* an Italian Night, showcasing great food … and the technology used to digitally scan the Antonine Wall.

Councillor Mahoney said: “For the first time ever, we’re running a mini-conference on the Antonine Wall. Guest speakers will include Dr David Breeze, the man who led the bid to turn the Roman wall into a World Heritage Site, and Dr Fraser Hunter of National Museums of Scotland. There will also be contributions about the John Muir Way, which runs past many parts of the Antonine Wall, and information on the new interpretation work to bring the Wall to life.”

Organisers regularly embrace “all things Roman” when finalising the programme.

This year, they’ve organised screenings of the Audrey Hepburn classic “Roman Holiday” in the Bo’ness Hippodrome. A giant Roman soldier model is also being installed in Falkirk Library to allow fans to take their very own “centurion selfies”.

The week will come to an end with a trek from Falkirk district into North Lanarkshire to trace the Antonine Wall from the ruins of Castlecary Roman Fort, by Allandale.

Leading all the walks will be Geoff Bailey of Falkirk Community Trust. “Geoff has been a terrific supporter of the festival since it began in 2009,” said Councillor Mahoney. “He’s taking part in many of the events during Big Roman Week, from walks along the Wall to discussions about recent archaeological finds in the local area. People are fascinated by the Romans and hopefully lots of local people will attend events during Big Roman Week.”

The idea to launch Big Roman Week came from The Friends of Kinneil charity in Bo’ness.

Maria Ford from the group said: “The festival has become a regular fixture in the local calendar and hopefully it continues to be popular with local people and visitors for many years to come.

“We’re really grateful to Falkirk Community Trust, which has organised many of the events for the Week, as well as Falkirk Council for supporting the Festival.

“Although the festival was born in Bo’ness, we’ve always been keen to involve people right across the district.”

Find out more at www.bigromanweek.org.uk

You can also get updates via the Friends of Kinneil’s social media channels:

http://www.facebook.com/kinneil (just “like”) and http://www.twitter.com/kinneil

 

THE ANTONINE WALL

  1. The Antonine Wall was built around 142AD on the orders of Roman Emperor Antoninus Pius.
  2. The turf and stone frontier – more accurately a turf rampart fronted by a wide and deep ditch – ran from Bo’ness right through Falkirk district to Old Kilpatrick, near Glasgow. Along the line of the Wall were a series of forts and fortlets.
  3. The defensive system was designed to hold back Caledonian tribes from invading southern Scotland, then under Roman rule.
  4. The Antonine Wall covered around 40 Roman miles, with around a third of the structure being constructed in Falkirk district.
  5. The Wall was abandoned in the 160s, when the Romans retreated to Hadrian’s Wall in northern England.
  6. Today, many parts of the Antonine Wall lie under towns and settlements, built long after the Romans departed Scotland. However, evidence of the wall’s ramparts and buildings can still be found.
  7. The local area is fortunate in having a number of highly visible parts of the Antonine Wall. As well as the remains of a fortlet at Kinneil, and a fort at Rough Castle, near Bonnybridge, the Antonine Wall can also be seen at Polmont Woods; Watling Lodge, Tamfourhill (near the Falkirk Wheel), Callendar Park in Falkirk; Seabegs Woods, near Bonnybridge; and Castlecary Roman Fort, near Allandale. You can also see the replica of a Roman tablet at Bridgeness, Bo’ness.
  8. In addition, there are free exhibitions on the Romans in local museums, Callendar House, Falkirk, and Kinneil in Bo’ness. Outside the district, there are displays in the Auld Kirk Museum in Kirkintilloch; the Hunterian Museum in Glasgow; and the National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh.
  9. The Wall became part of the Frontiers of the Roman Empire World Heritage Site in 2008, joining Hadrian’s Wall and the German Limes frontier. It also meant that Falkirk district became home to Scotland’s fifth world heritage site.
  10. The Big Roman Week was launched in 2009 to celebrate the area’s Roman links. The Festival is always held around September 19 – the date of the Emperor Antoninus Pius’s birthday.
  11. A new website for the Wall has been launched at http://www.antoninewall.org … An app for smartphones is also being developed.

 

 

The Friends of Kinneil is a registered charity
Charity Registration Number : SC038368

Visit us online at: http://www.kinneil.org.uk
Email us: info@kinneil.org.uk

 

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Bid to get Queensferry residents to be more active

walking-cycling-southqueensferry-web1A campaign is getting underway to encourage more people to walk, cycle and use public transport.

Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) across Scotland – including Queensferry Ambition – are organising special events to support European Mobility Week, which gets formally underway on September 16.

The events have been funded by Business Improvement Districts Scotland with grant funding from Transport Scotland. South Queensferry’s campaign has also been supported by the City of Edinburgh Council.

Maggie Mitchell from Queensferry Ambition says: “The message is that making smarter travel choices helps local economies. It also makes us healthier. Simple lifestyle changes – like leaving the car and walking, cycling or taking the bus – can make a big difference. So what’s stopping us?”

She continued: “Figures supplied by the EU show an increase in trading where walking and cycling are the norm – by up to 40 per cent.

“There are other benefits, too. Adults who walk and cycle tend to be more productive at work, take fewer sick days and spend less time, on average, seeing their GP. And children who walk or cycle to school perform better in class.

“In Queensferry, we’re doing some survey work to identify barriers to people being more active. We’re also trying to literally get folks on their bikes by setting up a stall on September 17 at Scotmid, just off the town centre, offering free bike MOTs and a chance to try electric bikes.”

Bike charity Sustrans works with local authorities to improve local cycle paths, including the John Muir Way, which runs right across the central belt.

The charity says: “Getting out walking or cycling burns calories, gets your heart pumping and works your legs and abs. It can also lift your mood, put a smile on your face and improve your general health and wellbeing.”

The Scottish Government has produced guidelines encouraging adults to do 30 minutes of moderate activity five or more days a week. Sadly a survey in 2012 found that only 45 per cent of men and 33 per cent of women were hitting the target.

Others think we should be doing even more.

Fitbit, which produces pedometers to measure walking and activity levels, suggests people should cover 10,000 steps a day – the equivalent to walking five miles. Most people can cover this distance (walking at a brisk pace) in under an hour and a half.

But many would say that any increased activity is a step in the right direction.

John Pryde, who helps run a fit camp in South Queensferry, says: “I often recommend starting small – getting off the bus two stops earlier and doing a little bit more exercise. Try something. If you’re moving more than you did before, you’ll be benefitting.”

His advice is echoed by Fiona Grant, a partner in JW Physiotherapy in South Queensferry, said: “Try to incorporate small movements within your day. A short walk at lunchtime, or getting off the bus sooner, or getting out for a walk in the evening. It’s important to tailor things to individuals because everyone is different.”

Maggie Mitchell continued: “Many of us have taken to shopping online, but there’s nothing better than going for a walk around the shops. It gives you some exercise, you can meet some lovely people, have a coffee – and perhaps bag a bargain at the same time.
“I hope people will support the campaign and think about their transport habits.
“Cutting down car use also cuts down emissions and the resulting pollution, and that has to be good for everyone too.”

Useful links

More information

  • Adrian Mahoney, The PR Store, tel. 07967 150560 or 01506 823714
    adrian@theprstore.co.uk
  • Maggie Mitchell, Queensferry Ambition, tel. 0131 331 3203; mobile: 07952 970325
    info@queensferryambition.co.uk